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Print version. Published on site Rusnet.NL 26 April 2004
Original: http://www.rusnet.nl/encyclo/e/esthist.shtml

Encyclopedia :: E :: Estonia: History

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Updated: 20.12.2003

The Estonians are first mentioned by the Roman historian Tacitus (1st century AD) in Germania. Their political system was patriarchal, based onclans headed by elders. The first invaders of the country were Vikings, who from the mid-9th century passed through Estonia and Latvia on their way to the Slavonic hinterland. In the 11th and 12th centuries the Danes and the Swedes tried to Christianise the Estonians, without success. Between 1030 and 1192 the Russians made 13 incursions into Estonia but failed to establish supremacy.

German conquest

Meinhard, a monk from Holstein, landed in 1180 on what is now the Latvian coast and for 16 years preached Christianity to the Livs, a Finno-Ugric tribe. His successor, Berthold of Hanover, appointed bishop of Livonia, decided that the sword must be used against the recalcitrant pagans. He was killed in 1198 in battle.

Albert of Buxhoevden, who succeeded him as bishop, proved himself a shrewd coloniser, pacifying the "treacherous Livs" and forcing them to build the fortress of Riga. To popularise recruitment for his army, Albert dedicated Livonia to the Virgin Mary. In 1202 he established the Order of the Brothers of the Sword.

By 1208 the knights were firmly established on both banks of the Western Dvina (Daugava) River, and Albert felt strong enough to proceed northward to the conquest of Estonia. In the following years the Estonians lost steadily in manpower, while the knights replenished theirs with new crusaders from Germany. The Russian princes of Novgorod and Pskov also raided Estonia on many occasions, penetrating especially deep in 1212 and 1216. Finally, in a major battle in 1217, the knights defeated the Estonians and killed their commander, Lembitu. Northern Estonia and the islands, however, remained free for another 10 years. To complete the conquest, Albert concluded an alliance with King Valdemar II of Denmark, who in 1219 landed with a strong army on the northern coast, on the site of Tallinn.

In 1237 the Brothers of the Sword, or Livonian Order, joined the Teutonic Order, which assumed control of Livonia. Northern Estonia and the islands were under Danish rule; Livonia (i.e., southern Estonia and Latvia) was shared between the Teutonic Order and the bishops. The terms under which the Estonian localities submitted were not severe, but the conquerors violated them as their position became stronger, provoking a series of revolts. After major risings in 1343 - 45, the Danish crown sold its sovereignty over northern Estonia to the Livonian Order in 1346. The Germans became the masters in the "Land of the Virgin" and, with minor exceptions, dominated its government, commerce, and the church for the next five centuries. The Estonians, the Latvians, and the Livs became the serfs of their conquerors, with little to sustain national feeling save their folklore and traditional crafts.

Swedish period

By the end of the 15th century two major powers were emerging around Livonia: Poland-Lithuania, already united in the south; and Muscovy, which had conquered Novgorod, in the east. More by diplomacy than by victory in battle, Lithuania gained Livonia on the dissolution of the Teutonic Order in 1561. Three years before, northern Estonia had capitulated to the king of Sweden.

The Muscovite tsar Ivan IV the Terrible had captured Narva in 1558 and penetrated deep into Estonia, bringing devastation with him, and it was not until 1581 that the Russians were expelled by the Swedes. In 1559 the bishop of Saaremaa had sold the Estonian islands to Denmark, but in 1645 they became part of the Swedish province. By the Truce of Altmark (1629), which ended the first Polish-Swedish war, the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth surrendered to Sweden the major part of Livonia, so that all Estonian lands then came under Swedish rule.

Prolonged wars left the country devastated, and many farms were unoccupied. The vacancies were partly filled by foreign settlers who were soon assimilated. This also gave the German nobility the opportunity to enlarge its estates, increase taxes, and exact more unpaid labour. The Swedish kings attempted to curb the power of the nobility and improve the lot of the peasants. Soon after Charles XI of Sweden came of age (1672), the nobles of Livonia were forced to show their title deeds, and those who failed to do so became tenants of the crown.

Russian conquest

The "good old Swedish days" for Estonia were more a legend than reality, but they ended with the Great Northern War. The Russian tsar Peter I the Great was finally able to achieve the dream of his predecessors and conquer the Baltic provinces. After the defeat of Charles XII of Sweden at Poltava in 1709 (see Battle of Poltava), Russian armies seised Livonia. The barons did not resist, angered as they were against the Swedish crown for its policy of reversion of estates. By the Peace of Nystad in 1721 Sweden ceded to Russia all its Baltic provinces.

The peasants' lot became worse than ever. In 1804, however, under the emperor Alexander I, the peasants of Livonia were given the right of private property and inheritance; a bill abolishing serfdom was passed in Estonia in 1811 and in Livonia in 1819. Other agrarian laws followed, in particular that of 1863 establishing the peasants' right of free movement; that of 1866 abolishing the landowners' right of jurisdiction on their estates, including the right to flog; and that of 1868 abolishing the corvée.

Estonian national awakening

The Estonian peasants benefited by these reforms, and at the end of the 19th century they possessed two-fifths of the privately owned land of thecountry. With the growth of urban prosperity as a result of industrialisation, the population increased. Improvement in education was such that by 1886 only about 2 percent of the Estonian army recruits were unable to read. National consciousness also increased.

The accession of Alexander III marked the beginning of a period of more rigid Russification. The Russian municipal constitution was introduced in 1882. Russian criminal and civil codes replaced the old Baltic ones. In 1887 Russian was made the language of instruction, instead of German and Estonian. In 1893 the University of Dorpat, now Tartu, which was then an important centre of German learning, was Russified. The first reaction of the Estonians was that poetic justice was being administered to their agelong oppressors, but they also feared reactionary Pan-Slavism. In 1901 in Tallinn, Konstantin Päts founded the moderately radical newspaper Teataja. In 1904, thanks to Päts, the Estonians won a clear victory on the Tallinn town council.

In January 1905 a revolution started in Russia and spread immediately to Estonia. Jaan Tônisson founded a National Liberal Party and organised its first congress in Tallinn on November 27. The 800 delegates soon split into a Liberal and a Radical wing, but both voted resolutions demanding political autonomy for Estonia. In December, Päts summoned a peasant congress in Tallinn. The Russian government responded by declaring martial law; this prompted parties of workers to scatter into the countryside, where they looted and burned manor houses. In the repression that followed, 328 Estonians were shot or hanged, and Päts and the Radical leader Jaan Teemant fled abroad, both having been sentenced "in contumacy" to death. (Päts returned in 1910.) At the elections to the first and the second Russian Duma, Estonian voters returned five deputies to the council.

Independence

The Russian Revolution of 1917 during World War I brought autonomy to Estonia. An Estonian National Council, which came to be known as theMaapäev, met on July 14 and on October 12 appointed a provisional government with Päts as premier.

The November coup d'état that brought the communists into power in Petrograd (St. Petersburg) made itself felt in Estonia. On November 28, 1917, the Estonian Diet decided to break away from the Russian state, but on December 8 the Russian Council of People's Commissars appointed a puppet communist government headed by Jaan Anvelt, who seized power in Tallinn but never obtained control of the whole country. (He was shot in Moscow in 1937.)

In February 1918, German forces entered Estonia. The communists fled, and on February 24 the Maapäev declared Estonia independent. The following day German troops entered Tallinn. Päts was briefly arrested, and other Estonian leaders went abroad or underground. On March 3 the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk was signed; sovereignty over the Baltic countries was transferred from Russia to Germany.

German rule lasted until Germany's capitulation to the Allies on November 11, 1918. The Estonian provisional government, again headed by Päts, immediately proclaimed independence, but the Soviet government declared the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk null and void, and on November 28 the Red Army took Narva and entered Estonia. Colonel (later General) Johan Laidoner opened a counter offensive in January 1919, supported by weapons and war matériel from the Allies, a British naval squadron, and a Finnish voluntary force of 2,700 men. By the end of February all Estonian territory had been freed, and the Estonian army penetrated into Soviet and Latvian territory.

On June 15, 1920, the constituent assembly (elected in April 1919), with August Rei as president, adopted a new constitution with a single-chamber Parliament (Riigikogu) of 100 members elected for three years, a system of proportional representation, and a chief of state (riigivanem), who was also the premier. Because no party had an absolute majority, government by coalition became the rule, and from May 1919, when the first constitutional cabinet was formed, to May 1933 Estonia had 20 coalitions headed by 10 statesmen.

On December 1, 1924, 300 conspirators, mostly Russians working on the transit base at Tallinn or smuggled in, tried to seise communications and call in Soviet troops but failed ignominiously. The Communist Party was outlawed, and the movement became virtually extinct.

The world economic depression of the early 1930s caused unemployment and the falling off of agricultural prices. The strong government action necessary to cope with the situation was precluded under the 1920 constitution. A new constitution in 1933 gave sweeping powers to the president. Päts became acting president and was expected to prepare the ground for the first presidential election. Instead, he proclaimed a state of emergency on March 12, 1934. Opposition leaders were arrested, the political activities of all parties were forbidden, and Päts assumed dictatorial powers. In December 1936 a new constituent assembly was elected. It prepared a third constitution with a chamber of 80 deputies elected by the majority system and a national council of 40 members. The election was held in February 1938. In April Päts was elected president for a term of six years.

Independence lost

The fate of Estonia was decided by the German-Soviet Nonaggression Pact of August 1939 between Nazi Germany and the USSR. On September 28 the Soviet government imposed on Estonia a treaty of mutual assistance that conceded to the Soviet Union several Estonian military bases, which were occupied forthwith. A broadly based nonpolitical government under Juri Uluots was appointed, but on June 16, 1940, a Soviet ultimatum demanded a new Estonian government, "able and willing to secure the honest application of the Soviet-Estonia mutual assistance treaty." The following day, Soviet forces occupied the whole country.

On July 21 the Chamber of Deputies was presented with a resolution to join the USSR; it was unanimously adopted the next day in spite of being contrary to constitutional procedure. On August 6 the Moscow Supreme Soviet incorporated Estonia into the USSR as one of its constituent republics. Meanwhile, Päts, Laidoner, and many other political leaders were arrested and deported to the USSR. In the first 12 months of Soviet occupation, more than 60,000 persons were killed or deported; more than 10,000 were removed in a mass deportation during the night of June 13 - 14, 1941.

On June 22, 1941, Germany attacked the USSR. Large areas of Estonia were freed from Soviet forces by improvised Estonian units before the German army reached Estonia. For three years Estonia was under German occupation, becoming part of the Ostland province. By February 1944, however, the Russians were back on the Narva front. About 30,000 Estonians escaped by sea to Sweden and 33,000 to Germany; many thousands perished at sea. On September 22, 1944, Soviet troops took Tallinn.

Soviet republic

The first post-war decade was a particularly difficult period of repression and Russification. The efforts of the regime to restructure the country in a Soviet mold rendered national political and cultural life virtually impossible. Mass deportations occurred in several waves, most significantly in 1949 during the campaign to collectivise agriculture. It has been estimated that as many as 80,000 Estonians were deported between 1945 and 1953. Massive immigration from Russia and other parts of the USSR decreased the indigenous proportion of the population.

Before the war Estonians made up almost 90 percent of the population. By 1990 the proportion had sunk to about 60 percent. The ruling Communist Party was disproportionately immigrant in character. A large-scale purge in 1950?51 left virtually no native Estonian officials in the highest positions. The situation changed somewhat in the late 1950s and early 1960s, but by the late 1980s the ruling elite was still heavily immigrant.

The Soviet liberalisation campaign of the late 1980s provided an opportunity for a national renaissance. In April 1988 an opposition Popular Front emerged. On June 16 the incumbent first party secretary, Karl Vaino, an immigrant, was dismissed. In the fall of 1988 the Popular Front pushed his successor, Vaino Väljas, to guide a resolution on sovereignty through the legislature. In the face of Soviet protests and warnings, Estonian law took precedence over Soviet legislation.

Independence restored

Proponents of independence won a clear victory in the March 1990 elections. On March 30, 1990, the Estonian legislature declared a transitionalphase to independence. Independence was declared formally in August 1991 and was accepted by the Soviet Union the following month.

In June 1992 a new constitution was adopted, and in September legislative and presidential elections were held, with Lennart Meri, who was supported by the Isamaa alliance, elected president. Among the key issues for independent Estonia were the rights of those residents of the republic who had immigrated after the Soviet annexation of Estonia in 1940. These non-ethnic Estonians (mostly ethnic Russians) were required to apply for citizenship, with naturalisation requirements including proficiency in the Estonian language. Relations between Russia and Estonia were strained over this issue and the continued presence in Estonia of Russian troops, which finally left the country in August 1994.

Despite allegations of corruption and abuse of office by some top officials, by the end of the 1990s Estonia had developed a stable democracy. Although affected by the Russian financial crisis of 1998, Estonia's economy was fairly robust throughout much of the late 1990s. In foreign affairs, the country sought to improve its often tense relations with Russia, joined the Partnership for Peace Program of the NATO, and pursued membership in the European Union.

  • Introduction
  • The land
  • The people
  • The economy
  • Administration and social conditions
  • Cultural life